CB8’s racial equity committee seeks change

Summer marks a well-deserved break for community boards across the city. Monthly committee meetings are typically suspended in July and August, allowing the hundreds of volunteers on the various boards enjoy some sunshine and take advantage of a chance to refresh.

Damaged tree finally falls, and park-goers make sound

Bob Mahoney noticed something amiss in Vinmont Veteran Park. He was walking through the 3.5-acre “pocket park” tucked between Riverdale and Mosholu avenues a couple years ago when he noticed a black cherry tree beginning a slow descent to the ground. It already was leaning into one of its neighbor’s branches.

FIRST ONLINE

Robbers targeting pedestrians wearing expensive jewelry

Police are investigating a string of gunpoint robberies that have plagued parts of the Bronx in recent weeks, including two incidents in Kingsbridge that cost local victims more than $4,000 in jewelry.

FIRST ONLINE

Century-old Sedgwick Ave home set to be demolished

A house that has towered over Sedgwick Avenue for more than a century is coming down. Permits were filed Wednesday to fully demolish the 3,700-square-foot home at 3377 Sedgwick.

No delay for Kinneret — School is back in session

Delays in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic are a problem for public schools, but not at any school run by Rabbi Aaron Frank.

ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT COMES HOME

Is it a fair question? Or is it just hate?

A vast majority of the seats in the city council are up for grabs in next year’s election, and with just over a year to go before voters head to the polls, candidates are launching campaigns, raising tens of thousands of dollars in donations, and trying to get their names out into the public while maintaining six feet of social distance from their would-be constituents.

Only ‘fare’ — Front-boarding, MetroCards return to buses

Every cloud has a silver lining, even in a public health crisis. In the midst of the widespread death and destruction of the coronavirus pandemic’s onset in the city, commuters — and simply those looking to just get around — could at least ride the bus at no cost.

School nurses ‘essential’ now more than ever before

Cuts, scrapes and bruises are common injuries among children. And when they happen at school, more often than not, there’s a nurse nearby to patch them up and send them back to class.

Little library keeps reading going when big libraries can’t

As the country searched to get a handle on the coronavirus pandemic, college towns emptied out as students were sent home in an effort to avoid further outbreak.

FIRST ONLINE

City sues Key Food owners for firing workers

The city's consumer and worker protection department is seeking more than $200,000 from both the former and current owners of Key Food, located inside the Skyview Shopping Center just south of West 259th Street, for what they say was an illegal firing of essential grocery workers in the middle of a pandemic.

Neighbors call ol’ sidewalk shed an eyesore

Sometimes it seems the official landmarks of New York City should not only include the Statue of Liberty and the Empire State Building, but also the infamous sidewalk shed.

Activists raise $11,000 to fight Waldo Avenue project

Petitions have been part of the Coalition to Save Brust Park ever since the public first learned of plans to build a high-density residential building in a Waldo Avenue lot where a single-family home originally stood.

Opinion

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POLICE BEAT

Cameras help find stolen SUV

Often, cars are stolen and never seen again, or might be found a little bit battered and parked on the side of a street. Sometimes, though, you can find a stolen car and its would-be owner sitting in plain sight.

POLITICAL ARENA

Stringer officially launches mayoral run

Although it should be no surprise to anyone paying any attention to city politics, New York City’s comptroller Scott Stringer is now officially running to succeed Bill de Blasio in the mayor’s office.

Press Points

SCHOOL DESK

UFT caucus takes aim at Carranza

The United Federation of Teachers filed for injunctive relief against city schools chancellor Richard Carranza on Sept. 4, following the delay in reopening physical public school campuses.