Candidates start lining up to replace Fernando Cabrera

A lot of local political attention has been focused on the race to succeed Andrew Cohen on the city council as he prepares to take the bench in the Bronx supreme court. But even though he’s leaving earlier than many of his colleagues, Cohen isn’t the only one facing term limits in the next year.

Pushed off campus, Lehman assembles online for musical

Penny Prince, a professor at Lehman College, has produced and directed musicals at the school for years. She’s written songs, worked with composers, and blocked out where actors would stand on stage. But for the first time this spring, Prince did all that without ever seeing her students’ faces.

Insell brings creative prowess to Bronx Arts Ensemble

Step aside, Stephane Grappelli — There’s a new jazz string musician in town. And she also happens to be the new artistic director for the Bronx Arts Ensemble. Bronx native and professional jazz violist Judith Insell has reached a new administrative height in a long history of organizational leadership.

City’s top accountant steps into mayoral race

The elections this November may be getting a lot of attention, but some of the biggest decisions facing voters at the city level won’t happen until next year when nearly every elected position within city hall is up for grabs.

'Impossible' Marble Hill plot claims another developer?

Frank Lloyd Wright once joked he could just “shake the buildings out of my sleeves.” But even the famed architect who constructed Fallingwater house over a Pennsylvania waterfall might have thrown up his arms in frustration if faced with the empty lot occupying 7-15 Terrace View Ave.

CB8’s racial equity committee seeks change

Summer marks a well-deserved break for community boards across the city. Monthly committee meetings are typically suspended in July and August, allowing the hundreds of volunteers on the various boards enjoy some sunshine and take advantage of a chance to refresh.

No delay for Kinneret — School is back in session

Delays in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic are a problem for public schools, but not at any school run by Rabbi Aaron Frank.

ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN CONFLICT COMES HOME

Is it a fair question? Or is it just hate?

A vast majority of the seats in the city council are up for grabs in next year’s election, and with just over a year to go before voters head to the polls, candidates are launching campaigns, raising tens of thousands of dollars in donations, and trying to get their names out into the public while maintaining six feet of social distance from their would-be constituents.

Mentoring from a distance

Riverdale Country School grads are ‘HomeBuddies’ for housebound kids

When Columbia University — and the rest of the city — shut down in mid-March, one of the first things Ernest Robertson thought about was the kids.

Damaged tree finally falls, and park-goers make sound

Bob Mahoney noticed something amiss in Vinmont Veteran Park. He was walking through the 3.5-acre “pocket park” tucked between Riverdale and Mosholu avenues a couple years ago when he noticed a black cherry tree beginning a slow descent to the ground. It already was leaning into one of its neighbor’s branches.

Little library keeps reading going when big libraries can’t

As the country searched to get a handle on the coronavirus pandemic, college towns emptied out as students were sent home in an effort to avoid further outbreak.

Neighbors call ol’ sidewalk shed an eyesore

Sometimes it seems the official landmarks of New York City should not only include the Statue of Liberty and the Empire State Building, but also the infamous sidewalk shed.

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GREEN SCENE

Documenting nature's beauty here in Riverdale's Park

Riverdale is full of parks. Some are quite large, like the 114 acres of Riverdale Park, while others are relatively small, like the less than 2 acres that make up Brust Park, probably known primarily by those who live in its proximity.