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Getting around New York City isn’t too difficult. That is, as long as you’re not dependent on a cane, walker or wheelchair. Sure, every bus in the five boroughs is accessible to those with mobility issues, but only a quarter of subway stations are equipped with elevators. Not only does that make those stations off-limits for many, it also means people with certain disabilities need to plan out their travel well in advance, even if it means just heading to the grocery store using the subway. more
Simon Cane is nearly indistinguishable from most other 8-year-old boys. He’s a third-grader at P.S. 81 Robert J. Christen. He is active, and loves playing outside. And he is an animal enthusiast — He loves his dog, Lola, and wants to be a veterinarian when he grows up. But when it comes to saving the environment, everyone else is running to keep up with him. more
Moving out of college is typically a time of mixed feelings — nostalgia for the good times, and optimism for the road ahead. Normally, it tends to happen at the end of the semester, but these are not normal times. After Manhattan College decided to close its campus for the rest of the semester March 17, administrators told students they had until March 27 to  clear their dorms. more
Weeks before life turned upside-down for everyone, life changed dramatically for the residents of 215 W. 242nd St. A one-alarm fire broke out on the morning of March 6, bringing everyone out of their apartments — some out of a home entirely. more
It took days of back-and-forth. But on Sunday, March 15, the announcement was made: Public schools in New York City were closing until at least the end of April. And hopefully, by then, the pandemic involving the coronavirus that causes COVID-19 could be a part of classrooms’ history lessons. more
Schools, offices, and restaurants are all trying to adapt to new rules set by New York’s governor and mayor as they try to “flatten the curve” and slow the spread of the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. There are some things that aren’t so concrete, however. While students will log into Google Classroom or attend lectures on the online conferencing app Zoom, and office workers check emails from home, there are entire movements also shifting online. more
The latest edition of The Riverdale Press is on newsstands now, but just in case you can't pick up a physical copy, we have the full e-edition right here. Free. more
A classroom is sometimes synonymous with boredom. After a certain amount of time, students drift away from the material and doodle in their notebooks, look out the window, or even begin to fall asleep. Most teachers would chide their students and tell them to pay attention. more
New York’s “patient zero,” at least as far as state health officials are concerned, was a Manhattan health care worker who had recently returned from Iran. She was followed by a New Rochelle lawyer who works in Manhattan. Then it was the rest of his family, including a daughter — who attends SAR High School in North Riverdale — and her older brother, a Yeshiva University student in Washington Heights. more
Although maintaining well manicured nails dates back thousands of years, the modern nail salon didn’t come into being until about the 19th century. more
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