Relaxed coronavirus rules could mean fewer closures

At one time, neither rain nor sleet nor snow nor hail could halt the nation’s postal service — or the operation of its largest public school system. But last year, something beyond inclement weather upended the educational system’s reputation for never closing.

Sunday Market kicks off new season with big changes

There was a lot for Shira Silverman to ponder as she kicked off a new season of The Riverdale Y’s Sunday Market last year. She anticipated everything she could. But there ended up being one variable she missed completely: the coronavirus pandemic.

Long road still ahead for specialized high school reform

In addition to all of the other responsibilities that come with the job, New York City’s next mayor will take the reins of the nation’s largest public school system. And that’s nothing to sneeze at, as 1.1 million students depend on the education they get there.

FIRST ONLINE

It’s finally over: Eric Dinowitz is going to City Hall

After nearly three years of running, former teacher Eric Dinowitz will succeed Andrew Cohen on the city council. At least until the end of this year.

Zoom becomes big election player

Shaking hands and kissing babies were once the way to winning elected office, but not when election season is in full swing in the middle of a pandemic. 

Neighbors fight to shield their backyards

By the end of this year, Corey Johnson and many of his city council colleagues will head for the door, their time up at City Hall. Yet, the Speaker doesn’t want to make that grand exit without establishing some kind of legacy, and he believes he has found it in a long-term comprehensive planning bill he’s simply called “Planning Together.”

Good for democracy, or for machines?

If there’s one thing the candidates in the March 23 special election may agree on, it’s that not enough people came out to vote.  Barely 9,000 of the district’s 90,000 registered voters cast early, live or absentee ballots in the race. For Mino Lora — who currently sits in second place in the race to replace Councilman Andrew Cohen behind early frontrunner Eric Dinowitz — this low turnout is by design.

Advocates applaud New York legalizing marijuana

State lawmakers accomplished something this budget season many deemed impossible: They finally legalized marijuana in New York. Effective immediately, anyone older than 21 in New York can legally carry up to three ounces of marijuana and even smoke it in public, although many restrictions on where that’s permitted already are in place. For instance, smoking it in schools or while driving a car remains illegal.

FIRST ONLINE

Riverdale Press wins 8 state awards, including top prize for general excellence

It's always a great day for community journalism, but Friday was even more special for The Riverdale Press team after winning eight statewide awards at the New York Press Association's Better Newspaper Contest, including one of the organization's most prestigious: the Past Presidents' Award for General Excellence.

Preschools ready for next fall’s free 3-K expansion

Many parents have longed for the opportunity for their children to see the inside of a classroom for the past year in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic. But come September, more of the city’s youngest learners might have the opportunity to do so.

Proposed traffic calming hits roadblock

Anonymous posting can be a nuisance. But when that anonymity migrates from the internet to the side of city streets, it can cause a bit more trouble — not to mention sending a project you’ve spent the better part of six months working on essentially back to square one.

Mayoral candidates split on role of city’s specialized high schools

There are only nine of them. And they stand at the forefront of academic excellence, as most of them require a standardized test for admission.

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POLICE BEAT

Not the car seat and scooter, too!

Stealing a car is one thing. But taking someone’s scooter and car seat? Well, that’s going too far.