FIRST ONLINE

Kingsbridge, Riverdale braces for looters on otherwise quiet night

Businesses up and down Broadway boarded up their windows and removed valuables from their stores Tuesday afternoon after police warned of potential looting once the city’s 8 p.m. curfew went into effect.

FIRST ONLINE

Engel to hot mic: Talking about Bronx violence because he's in a primary

U.S. Rep. Eliot Engel has returned to the Bronx after weeks of his self-imposed exile to Washington, D.C., but apparently told Bronx borough president Ruben Diaz Jr., he's concerned  because he's in the middle of what's probably the most difficult primary he's ever faced as a congressman, in a private exchange caught on camera..

FIRST ONLINE

Ghebreghiorgis bows out of congressional race

With just weeks to go before Democratic primary, Andom Ghebreghiorgis announced Monday morning he’s dropping out the Congressional race challenging U.S. Rep. Eliot Engel, and instead will endorse fellow challenger Jamaal Bowman.

FIRST ONLINE

With June 8 nearing, de Blasio outlines reopening plan’s first phase

Mayor Bill de Blasio thinks it’s time for New York City to start down the long road past the “new normal” and closer to life beyond the coronavirus pandemic.

Eviction freeze is nice, but some want rent freeze, too

Since before the Obama administration ended, unemployment has been so low, at below 4 percent, it seemed anyone who wanted a job could get one. The coronavirus changed that, however, with figures jumping to more than 14 percent in April — its highest since the Great Depression. Millions are out of work, and even with financial help from the federal government, many still can’t pay bills — like rent.

Ensuring seniors are safe right call for RNH

In the era before coronavirus — which can feel like eons ago at this point — it was easy to move through a typical day without thinking much about neighbors. Sure, you might wave on the sidewalk, or hold the elevator door, but it was easy not to talk much.

Remembering Urban Ellis

It was 1997 when Urban Ellis decided it was time to live the good life.  But by 2002, he shook off years of inactivity, rising to become a major provider for the place he had called home since 1958: Marble Hill.

Essential workers of all kinds settle into some new routines

Thousands of businesses in New York are closed, deemed “non-essential” by Gov. Andrew Cuomo as the state continues following social distancing measures to slow the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the coronavirus. Even “non-essential” office workers are working from home, often juggling child care, school, and their day-to-day home lives, while trying to fit in work where they can.

Lehman honors graduate claimed by COVID-19

For many college students, May is the month of commencements and graduation speeches. But then again, this is 2020, and it’s no typical year with the coronavirus pandemic, meaning the glamour of the pomp and circumstance surrounding finally getting that degree is lost.

DECISION 2020

Ravelo fights for monthly stipends, immigration reform

Sammy Ravelo has achieved a lot since arriving in the United States as a teenager ahead of his official paperwork legally making that possible. And now, Ravelo is ready to overcome even more — including a crowded field seeking to represent New York’s 16th Congressional District in the upcoming Democratic primary.

Schools get tested on when — and how — to reopen

School doors remain tightly shut as the coronavirus makes its way through thousands of people in New York. But they won’t remain closed forever. When it’s time once again to reopen classrooms and school buildings, how will that happen? And what can administrators — and even parents — do to keep children safe?

Bill de Blasio’s plan to beat heat: free A/C

Landlords are required to pump heat into apartments during the winter. But when it comes to summertime, tenants are generally on their own. As temperatures rise outside, window and ceiling fans inside can’t keep up, literally turning some units into ovens that could put their occupants in the hospital — or worse. 

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GREEN SCENE

Documenting nature's beauty here in Riverdale's Park

Riverdale is full of parks. Some are quite large, like the 114 acres of Riverdale Park, while others are relatively small, like the less than 2 acres that make up Brust Park, probably known primarily by those who live in its proximity.